Sometimes modifiers come between a subject and its verb, but these modifiers should not confuse the match between the subject and his verb. Expressions of rupture like half, part of, a percentage of, the majority of are sometimes singular and sometimes plural, depending on the meaning. (The same is true, of course, when all, all, more, most and some act as subjects.) The totals and products of mathematical processes are expressed in singular and require singular verbs. The phrase “more than one” (weirdly) takes on a singular verb: “More than one student has tried to do so.” Example: the quality of the apples was not good. In addition, the “quality of apples” and the verb “were.” As the theme “apple quality” is singular, the singular verb “was” should have been used instead of “were.” The correct sentence is: the quality of the apples was not good. The first example expresses a wish, not a fact; Therefore, what we usually consider plural is used with the singular. (Technically, this is the singular theme of the object clause in the subjunctive mind: it was Friday.) Usually, it would look awful. However, in the second example, where a question is formulated, the spirit of subjunctive is true. Note: the subjunctive mind is losing ground in spoken English, but should nevertheless be used in speeches and formal writings. 9.

In sentences beginning with “there is” or “there,” the subject follows the verb. As “he” is not the subject, the verb corresponds to the following. The verb-subject agreement is one of the most fundamental parts of the English Grammer and is often repeated in trials. Checking and practicing the rules with a few questions for each will help you fully understand the agreement between themes and verb and avoid many common errors that occur in the exam. The rule of thumb. A singular subject (she, Bill, auto) takes a singular verb (is, goes, shines), while a plural subject takes on a plural verb. Example: The list of items is on the desktop. If you know that the list is the topic, then choose for the verb.

We will use the standard to highlight themes once and verbs twice. This rule can cause shocks on the road. For example, if I`m one of the two subjects (or more), this could lead to this strange phrase: rule 5a. Sometimes the subject is separated from the verb by such words, as with, as well as, except, no, etc. These words and phrases are not part of the subject. Ignore them and use a singular verb if the subject is singular. Rule6: “There” and “here” are never subjects. In sentences that begin with these words, the theme is usually found later in the sentence. For example, there were five books on the shelf. (were, corresponds to the theme of the book) This sentence refers to the individual efforts of each crew member. The Gregg Reference Manual provides excellent explanations for the subject-verb agreement (section 10: 1001).

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